Life-changing, Educational Wilderness Programs

Creating guides and guardians of our natural world

Whether you’d like to pursue a career in field guiding or simply spend some time in the bush and connect with nature, EcoTraining can help you gain the relevant qualifications and skills, while providing you with unforgettable wilderness experiences.

“There is no passion to be found playing small – in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living.”
Nelson Mandela

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Blog: from the field

Wild dogs arrive at Mashatu
February 24, 2017

It was an exciting week at our camp as a pack of eight Wild dogs were released on the Mashatu Game reserve. With a little luck on our side the students got to be the very first people to see them after being released.

Phoebe Mottram: A Conservationist in the making
February 22, 2017

Since her first course with EcoTraining in 2015, Phoebe Mottram was hooked and came back for three other courses afterwards. “To put it simply EcoTraining has changed my life and I can’t thank them enough for that”!

Love lessons from the bush
February 14, 2017

Love takes its shape and form in a countless number of ways, be it between humans or animals. In the past 23 years, our trainers and students learning amidst wildlife, have been lucky enough to witness and capture all sorts of love lessons from the bush. What better way to learn than from nature itself. 

Seeing your first elephant in the wild
February 06, 2017

Abbie got to see her very first elephant in the African bush, all the while driving a game drive vehicle for the first time. What would seem like a daunting experience turned out to be an unforgettable moment that will be remembered for a lifetime.

A lioness, 5 cubs and a kudu kill
February 02, 2017

What at first seemed as a week of average game encounters, soon turned into a very exciting week, filled with some amazing wildlife sightings.

Camp news: Floods at Mashatu
January 31, 2017

At EcoTraining, our trainers and learners acknowledge and respect that Mother Nature is more powerful than man. It is a humbling concept that they experience on a daily basis in our wilderness areas. Be it a towering elephant crossing one's path or a torrential downpour that floods our camp nestled on the river banks.