Tracking Course

Tracking: What is animal tracking?

Animal tracking (also known as spoorsny in Afrikaans) is more complex than most people might think. We invite you to join us on this exciting learning adventure, while you learn to connect with nature and get back to your roots.

Cheetah Quiz

EcoTraining Quiz: Cheetah

Test your knowledge with this week’s EcoTraining Quiz!


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Jeremy Bishop turtle

EcoTraining Quiz: Marine Life

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Leopard vs Wildebeest

Predatory Prowess | Leopard in action

Anyone that has ever had the opportunity to witness the sheer power and prowess of big cats in action can stand testament to a leopard’s ability to catch and kill prey far larger than themselves. In this instance, a male leopard weighing around 85kg caught and killed a blue wildebeest bull which could have weighed as much as 290kg!

The video itself was filmed shortly after the kill, with the male leopard and his prey still exposed out in the open, hence the male’s herculean effort to pull this monstrosity into thicker bush and away from the prying eyes of vultures which would alert other, larger predators like lions and hyaenas to the presence of a free meal. This sighting was no exception.

Over the course of a few days, we watched as this leopard was chased by wild dogs (the dogs did not steal the kill as they are not carrion feeders) and then later fend off various attempts of hyaenas to steal his hard-earned prize.

In the end, the sighting lasted nearly three days with the big tom eventually relinquishing the remains of his kill to a pride of lions.

This, of course, is a regular occurrence for all predators, not just leopards, where competition for food is fierce. Lions are regular thieves, which should be a great reminder that the stealthy hyaenas aren’t the only mega-predators to stoop to such lows as to scavenge hard-earned meals from others. However, EcoTraining instructor Sean Matthewson has on one occasion seen a leopard scavenge from lions when the pride happened to leave a large giraffe carcass to go drink water. A young female leopard snuck in and stole as many mouthfuls of rotting giraffe as she could before the return of the pride heralded her silent departure from the carcass, the lions oblivious to her presence.

This is, of course, the cycle of life, the survival of the fittest.

Watch the amazing powers of this male leopard trying to move his wildebeest prize.

If you want to learn more about leopards why not try your hand at our EcoTraining Leopard Quiz?

Tree climbing lion

Kenya in February

February is an unbelievable time to travel to East Africa, and this time of year Kenya experiences the lowest levels of precipitation in the Masai Mara but the birdlife is in abundance and it also happens to be lion season!

When travelling through East Africa it is never a guarantee that it will not rain, as the famous tropical storms of Kenya could hit at any moment, however in the earlier months of the year the rainfall is substantially less than the later months, this means that the game viewing is fantastic and you won’t be bumbling around in a waterproof poncho for half of the day.

Giraffe in kenya

Giraffe at sunset (c) Tayla McCurdy

Good weather also means beach weather and the coastline of Kenya sure does boast some incredible spots. Kenya is renowned for its national parks and wildlife, but also the 1,420 kilometres of Kenyan coastline, it is home to some of the most beautiful destinations, beaches and Marine National Parks in Africa. Most of Kenya’s finest beaches are found just north and south of Mombasa in the southeast of the country. Here are some of the amazing spots you wouldn’t want to miss out on, especially in the summer weather:

  1. Diani Beach
  2. Lamu Island
  3. Watamu
  4. Malindi Bay
  5. Kilifi
Watamu Kenya

Watamu Coastline (c) Tara Turkington via Wonders of Watamu

It’s not only the coastline that is bustling with life in the warmer months, the bush in February is rich with birdlife and their sounds and songs bring the wilderness to life, there is a variety of intra-African and Palearctic migrants in the beginning of the year so, if you’re a keen birder this will be paradise. with over 1,100 recorded species it is definitely one of the top birding destinations. Here are some of the star birds that should be on any birders list:

  1. White-bellied Go-away Bird
  2. Amani Sunbird
  3. Rüppell’s Vulture
  4. Cinnamon-chested Bee-eater
  5. Grey Crowned Crane
  6. Ross’s Turaco
  7. D’Arnaud’s Barbet
  8. Black-and-white Casqued Hornbill
  9. Superb Starling
  10. White-headed Buffalo-Weaver
Birds in Kenya

Some birds you could see in Kenya (c) Tayla McCurdy

From January to March the lions are out in full force, hence this time of year is called lion season. As the plains game such as wildebeest and zebra drop their young the Masai Mara becomes dotted with new-born calves, which means only one thing – predators.

Lions in Kenya

Predator season in Kenya (c) Tayla McCurdy

Lions are not the only predators that will be out in full force, there have been some amazing sightings of leopard, hyena and cheetah in the Masai Mara, as well as around EcoTraining’s camp at Mara Training Centre.

The predator game viewing is particularly fantastic in the Masai Mara year-round, another great time to travel to see some of these big cats in action is during the Great Migration, which falls in the dryer winter months in East Africa from around June to October.

Kenya Predators

Predators of the Mara (c) Tayla McCurdy

The adventures in Kenya are endless, you could be ticking some amazing birds off your life list, relaxing on the beach or have some mind-blowing sightings in the Masai Mara – what are you waiting for?

Here are some of the courses coming up this year:

Kenya Safari Guide: 01 February – 28 February 2020 (Mara Training Centre)

Masai Mara EcoQuest: 07 February – 13 February 2020 (7 days) or 07 February – 20 February (14 days)

EcoTraining Kenya Field Guide: 06 October – 29 November 2020 (Mara Training Centre)

If you want to learn more about Kenya maybe try your hand at our EcoTraining East Africa Inspired Quiz.

Leopard cubs

EcoTraining Quiz: Leopards

Test your knowledge with this week’s EcoTraining Quiz!


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Game Drive in Karongwe

The Classroom of Karongwe

Shaded by mighty Jackalberry trees, EcoTraining Karongwe Camp waits patiently for its first group of 2020 students. The expectant energy is palatable. The new students will be embarking on a 55-day EcoTraining Field Guide Course which will solidify the bedrock of each participant’s potential career as a field guide.

The unfenced solar-powered camp area lies unobtrusively adjacent to the dry Karongwe riverbed where new students will delight in discovering numerous bird and mammal species. At this time of year, the bush is alive with activity. The summer rains have washed away the dust and replaced it with emerald abundance.
The resident Nyala family feeds below a canopy of Tamboti trees and even they seem anxious to welcome the new students. The lambs bounce around excitedly jostling for front row seats and above them in the eaves, Paradise Flycatchers flit in a boastful aerial display.

Plants

“The summer rains have washed away the dust and replaced it with emerald abundance.”

The open-air classroom entices all sounds and smells of the wilderness in. A library of textbooks and a collection of skulls, tortoise shells and animal bones are lined tidily for students to explore. Yet the space beyond the formal classroom boundaries will invite students on a much greater journey of enquiry beyond their wildest dreams. Every bird that chirps, every leaf that falls, every flower that blooms and every insect that rattles in song is an opportunity to gain knowledge and connection with the fauna and flora of the Lowveld wilderness.

Karongwe in summer

The rains bring Karongwe bush to life

At the edge of the camp lies the fireplace. As dusk stretches the shadows and awakens the stars, the earth has the power to draw everyone magnetically in. It is around this blazing campfire that learning will transcend facts and figures and where wisdom will be shared through storytelling.

As an African barred owlet hoots somewhere in the distance and his message for the new students is clear… “Protect this wilderness, for you are the guardians of its future.”

Karongwe camp wildlife

The beauty of Karongwe

It is a privilege to be an EcoTraining student because you hold these wild spaces in your hands and in your heart, and have the collective ability to nurture it for future generations. Karongwe is a classroom sanctuary where custodians of nature are born and inspired.

Good luck to all the students of 2020!

Pangoli

EcoTraining Quiz: Endangered species

Test your knowledge with this week’s EcoTraining Quiz!


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Wild dog Quiz

EcoTraining Quiz: Wild Dogs

Test your knowledge with this week’s EcoTraining Quiz!


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