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Chacma baboon

Baboons and their behavior | All you need to know

Certainly not one of the Big 5 and not on many viewing bucket lists, baboons are often seen as a pest. Yet their social structures hold a mirror up to modern human society. Our quirks, traits and behaviours’ are often seen to be similar within their social structures.

Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon (c) David Batzofin

They are social creatures that live in large troops, which have a definite hierarchy. Family orientated, they participate in mutual grooming sessions and food sharing. Much like humans, they have a set daily routine, which involves waking up at a set time, going about their daily business and then settling down again at night.

Baboons are omnivores, eating a wide array of meats and plants. Typical foods in a baboon’s diet include grasses, fruits, seeds, roots, bark, rodents, birds and small or young mammals when the opportunity arises.

Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon (c) David Batzofin

If you are a regular visitor to the bush, you will be familiar with the loud barking sound that they make. What people don’t know is that they are capable of making around 30 different vocalizations. These include some most un-baboon like grunts and screams. They also have a series of non-vocal communication gestures.

The Chacma baboon is the largest of the species. In 2010, the fossil skull of a two million years old individual was discovered near Johannesburg in South Africa.

Similar to hamsters, baboons have cheek pouches in which they can store food. This helps while they are foraging as it can be brought back to a safe area to be eaten.

Mothers and babies have a special bond and the baby will remain close to its mother for at least the first four months before it is allowed to interact with other youngsters. After birth they are carried under the belly of the mother, graduating to riding on her back when they are older.

Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon (c) David Batzofin

Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon (c) David Batzofin

The dominant males will often interact with the youngsters and will be seen to be grooming as well as disciplining them should the need arise.

Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon (c) David Batzofin

Despite what local farmers think of this primate, it was revered in Ancient Egypt for its intelligence. It is still seen as the guardian of the dead in the Underworld.

Perhaps we do not give them enough credit for their contribution to the wildlife tapestry of Africa. Or perhaps it is just the fact that they are seen as too representative of us, but baboons are here to stay and should be embraced rather than reviled and rejected.

Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon (c) David Batzofin

Want to know more about baboons, watch our video on EcoTraining TV on YouTube to find out more.

Women's Day

Women’s Day 2019 | Today and everyday we celebrate you

The field of guiding is attracting more women into the industry every day. This August EcoTraining celebrates those women who are dedicating their lives to making our natural world a nurturing one.

Jennifer Palmer, is the founder of Women for Wildlife, an organization that seeks to empower local communities and at the same time, work towards the goal of conserving wildlife. She recently spent time at all of the EcoTraining camps and was part of several courses that were running in those camps at the time.

Jennifer Palmer

Jennifer Palmer

Jennifer, who has a Masters Degree in International Applied Ecology and Conservation, was able to immerse herself in both the ethos of EcoTraining and the roles that women play in the South African guiding industry.

Her work and passion has taken her to more than 40 countries including in Latin America, the South Pacific and now Africa.

Her goal she says “is to bring people together with compassion to make a difference in the world”.

As a solo traveller, she shared some tips for other women who might find themselves in similar situations, listen to what she has to say on her solo travels.

She also shared her thoughts about her time at the EcoTraining camps.

Jennifer Palmer

Jennifer Palmer

Another incredible initiative is called Rise of the Matriarch have a look at their YouTube channel and follow the incredible journey all these remarkable women are on.

In honour of Women’s Day, we’ve put together a video of some of the EcoTraining Women who show us that being brave, strong and independent has never looked so good!

Women's Day

EcoTraining TV – Women’s Day 2019

There are so many women out there that are making a difference every single day. We want you all to know that we appreciate your drive and dedication to the industry.

If you have a passion, a dream and a drive for conservation then take a look at the courses or careers available at EcoTraining.

 

elephant encounter

World Ranger Day 2019

July 31st we celebrated World Ranger Day. And by extension, it should also be celebrated as World Field Guide Day.

If you are a Field Guide, Game Ranger or involved in the conservation and eco-tourism industry, then thank you for your time and dedication. We appreciate all those who put in the effort every day to conserve and teach those around us about Africa and the majestic wilderness that surrounds us. If you have ever thought about learning more or getting involved in the industry, whether as a full-time profession or just to learn and broaden your knowledge, then read on…

If your answer is yes, and joining the guiding industry is something that you are passionate about? Or perhaps you just want to up-skill your bushcraft. If either of these is an option, then an EcoQuest course might just be what you are looking for.

Instructor Mike Anderson point of tracks

Instructor Mike Anderson point of tracks (c) David Batzofin

If you find yourself on Safari or on a game drive with friends, and your thirst for knowledge and your need to know more about the wilderness around you is too much, then look no further than an EcoTraining EcoQuest Course.

The course is a ‘snapshot‘ of the Professional Field Guide Course that we offer.

Tree Squirrel

Tree Squirrel (c) David Batzofin

Time in the bush is not always about dangerous game and encounters with those that have teeth, claws and horns.

It is also about taking time to appreciate the ‘smaller’ inhabitants and how they contribute to a particular eco-system.

Game Rangers

(c) David Batzofin

Some of the course’s unique selling points are:

The EcoQuest courses can be tailored to suit individuals or groups.

Participants can sign up for either a 7 or 14-day course, depending on how much time they have at their disposal.

Do you have a speciality that you would like to highlight?

We can structure your course time to focus on that.

It is an immersive experience, in world-class wilderness regions.

Baboon skull

Baboon skull (c) David Batzofin

The course is designed to inform, educate and entertain. Finding skulls and identifying them is just one of the activities that can be experienced during an outing.

Flower

(c) David Batzofin

Each of the EcoTraining camps in South Africa,  Selati, Karongwe, Pridelands and Makuleke are situated in different biomes.

Thus making the vegetation very different.

bug

(c) David Batzofin

Did you know that there are about 100,000  insect species in South Africa?

Most of the reading material only mentions a fraction of these, however, you can find out more about some of those on the walks from the various EcoTraining camps where this course is presented.

Luckily, most of the species found in South Africa are harmless but it does help to know which might sting or bite.

Elephant tracks

Elephant tracks (c) David Batzofin

What does the EcoQuest course cover?

The course consists of drives, walks and lectures.

Each activity covers flora, fauna as well as tracking and spoor identification.

Termite mound

A termite mound (c) David Batzofin

Aside from the underground construction by this insect, termites also build these above-ground structures.

They can vary in height and are made out of clay that is stuck together with saliva. Should a portion of this mound be broken, they can repair it in record time.

Sunset in the African bush

Sunset in the African bush (c) David Batzofin

Walking back to camp as the sun sets.

A perfect ending to a day filled with exciting new experiences.

Camp fire

Campfire (c) David Batzofin

Share experiences around a roaring campfire.

There are stories to be told and it is here where friendships are made and lifetime bonds formed.

 

EcoTraining Managing Director, Anton Lategan sat down with David Batzofin and shared his hopes and dreams for EcoTraining.
Where we have come from and where we are going. Listen to the interview here.

Impala ram

The Impressive Impala

Believe it or not, impala are one of a kind! They are the only member of the genus Aepyceros that falls under the Bovidae family (which includes buffalo, sheep, goats, and cows). However, there are two sub-species, the common impala and the very rare black-faced impala, found only in Namibia and Angola.

Being an apex prey species, this graceful animal can jump up to 3m in height and 10m in length. Combine that with speeds of up to 60km/h and you will realize that they have an amazing skill set to evade predators. This being said, they sometimes, literally, just jump for joy. ‘Impala’ is the Zulu word for ‘gazelle’.

Only the males have horns, which are used for defence as well as an attack during the mating season. The horns take several years to reach full length and that is the reason that younger males do not challenge for dominance. A gland on the forehead of the rams produces a scent that informs their rivals of their status.

Impala image

David Batzofin (cc)

There is a common theory that female impala, have been known to delay giving birth if the weather conditions are harsh. Impala young are born in the middle of the day when their main predators are resting. The females synchronize their birthing so that there are large numbers of young as up to half of the newborns are killed within their first few weeks. Twice as many females as males are born annually.

David Batzofin (cc)

Impalas have to drink every day, but as predators’ frequent waterholes at dawn or dusk, the impala is often seen drinking in the hottest part of the day when the chance of being attacked is reduced.

Most of the cat species will prey on both the adult impala as well as the youngsters and new-born. Baboons have been known to kill and eat smaller individuals as well.

Impalas are social animals and are usually never seen alone. Females and youngsters will live together in mixed herds with a dominant male, while the males will live in bachelor herds. There is an increase of males in a herd during the rutting season. Herd living has the advantage of confusing predators when they scatter.

There is another theory that surrounds impala (that has yet to be proven. It is thought that they produce a scent from glands on their hind legs, this scent is released when they kick high when they are airborne. The purpose of the scent is to enable the herd to regroup after they have scattered. Covering a wide range, they will migrate seasonally depending on food availability.

David Batzofin (cc)

Do you have any specific questions about Impala you would like answered?

Drop us a comment below and we will respond to you.

If you want to know more about impala have a look at the video on EcoTraining TV or if you are interested in learning first hand about African wildlife have a look at the courses we offer.

YouTube Video

EcoTraining TV | Learn the facts: All you need to know about Impala

EcoTraining is launching the accredited FGASA Field Guide course in the Masai Mara, Kenya

EcoTraining, South Africa’s largest and oldest safari guide and wildlife training organisation will be offering the well-known FGASA level 1 (NQF 2) accredited Field Guide qualification in Kenya from the 14th September this year. A recognised accreditation in Kenya, the launch of this course also means lower rates for participants who want to acquire this qualification at a rate of USD 7,970.00.

Over the duration of fifty five days, participants on this course will traverse not one, not two but three different conservancies encompassing over 16,000 hectares, providing students access to a diverse range of biomes and elements that make this a truly sought after course in the industry.

Students will stay in unfenced tented and banda accommodation over the duration of the course. This truly immersive ‘live-in’ experience will allow participants to connect with the natural environment and develop their situational awareness which is an important part of becoming a field guide professional.

This course provides a solid foundation for many environmental careers in the wildlife, lodge and conservation sector. What makes this course so unique is its relevance to the natural environment of Kenya. Covering a broad spectrum of subjects, students also learn about the cohabitation and conflict between the community herdsmen with their livestock, crops and wildlife.

The course contains a combination of formal lectures and practical field experience, affording students the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills whether it be on game drives or on-foot guided walks. Participants will have the opportunity to be assessed for their EcoTraining and FGASA Field Guide (NQF2) qualification which is conducted by EcoTraining instructors who are accredited FGASA assessors.

EcoTraining is of the firm belief that conservation is about people effecting positive change in the world. This is a milestone for EcoTraining in the plight for providing more access to environmental education in Kenya.

For more information about this upcoming course contact enquiries@ecotraining.co.za

10 Tips on how to Survive Hot Summer Camping in South Africa

One thing to keep in mind is that South African summers can get very hot. How hot you might ask? It’s not unusual for it to get as high as the mid 30 degrees to low 40 degrees Celsius.  If you are not used to or have not been exposed to these extreme temperatures, you might wonder how you will ever survive this scorching heat.