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South Africa Is Travel Ready - Ecotraining

South Africa Is Travel Ready

The lift in restrictions could not have come at a better time. South Africa is known for its lovely weather and what better time to step foot on South African soil than during the spring months leading to summer. You can look forward to lovely weather as you enjoy the stunning beaches, wildlife and landscape the country has to offer.

EcoTraining Makuleke Concession

Into the Wild | by Ntsakisi Matelakengisa

As a young girl, I would never have thought that I could ever have loved being out in the wild, seeing the beautiful animals and driving around the scenic nature routes as much as I did. But, luckily for me, I got to grow up with a family that enjoyed going to areas such as the Kruger National Park and this gave my love a chance to grow even more.

The True Skill of Guiding as told by a Professional Safari Guide

These days, guiding and becoming a Professional Safari Guide no longer means, simply getting the tan, driving the big 4 x 4, and heading home during your two weeks off, to tell everyone that you are a “Game Ranger”.

The Great Migration - Sustainable Travel and Ecotourism - Kenya

Sustainable Travel and Ecotourism in Kenya

Ecotourism is becoming an increasingly growing trend and should be rightfully so. After all, certain aspects of tourism are a large contributor to environmental degradation. Beyond that, tourism can also be a cruel industry where its profit falls into the hands of the few and not necessarily the local community. Such was the problem of Kenya…that is, until the dawn of sustainable travel and ecotourism – By Richards Cole

Wilderness Trails Skills - Tips and Tricks for the Wilderness - Trails Skills Course

Tips and Tricks for the Wilderness Trails Skills Course

Imagine, finding yourself out in the African bush, surrounded by the wilds of nature, from the whoops of hyena as the sun sets to the roars of a lion going into dawn, to the grunts of a hippo in the nearby waterhole.  With all your belongings carried on your back, you will be immersed in nature, become part of the natural system and be forever changed. The question is; do you have what it takes to do a Wilderness Trail?

If you think that you are the type of person who can be absorbed by the natural beauty of the wilderness, have your breath taken away by the beauty of birds in flight and feel utterly at peace in the silence of nature then you are definitely in the right place. On an EcoTraining Wilderness Trails Skills Course, your nights will be spent sleeping under a blanket of billions of stars and you will be able to explore some of the last untouched wilderness areas in Southern Africa on foot. You will have a chance to forget the hustle and bustle of your everyday life and be able to get back to basics and appreciate the solitude and silence whilst being surrounding by the breathtaking beauty of the Makuleke in the Northern Kruger National Park.

Before you start the journey on the Wilderness Trails Skills Course, we thought you might want a few quick tips that may help you along the way…

Wilderness Trails Skills Tips and Tricks

Tips:
  • Ziploc bags are great to have to allow you to store rubbish. Sealing your rubbish will ensure you don’t get ants in your back-pack.
  • Pack a pocket knife or Leatherman you never know when this will come in handy.
  • Make sure you have a good-quality torch, preferably a head torch (that won’t need charging)
  • Throw in a pair of gaiters or you are more than welcome to pick grass seeds and thorns from your socks every evening.
  • Take our EcoTraining Bush Survival Quiz – this will help you prepare yourself for any situation – from digging for water to locating water, or even learning how to make a rope etc…
Wilderness-Trails-skills-buffalo-encounter

Wilderness Trails Skills (c) Ian Glenn

What to Pack:
  • Sleeping bag (check temperature rating)
  • Sleeping bag inner (if needed for warmth & keeps sleeping bag clean)
  • Sleeping mat (foam roll mat) or inflatable hiking mattress (minimalist)
  • Cooking utensils (spoon to cook and eat with is sufficient)
  • Cooking equipment (stackable camping cooking set)
  • Hiking gas stove (plus spare gas canister in case you run out)
  • Personal first aid kit (small)
  • Torch/ headlamp (strong beam) – new batteries plus spare
  • Personal toiletries & sundry – Toilet paper, Toothbrush plus small Toothpaste, Sunscreen
  • Personal clothing (absolute minimal)
    • Neutral coloured: 1 set for walking, 1 set for sleeping
    • Spare pair of socks
    • Fleece and beanie for cold weather
    • Rain poncho (can also be used as a groundsheet to sleep on)
    • Hat (preferably wide-brimmed)
  • Good comfortable walking shoes/boots/trainers
  • Flip-flops for evenings and water travel
  • Backpack (40 – 60L max)
Water:
    • A 3-litre bladder in your back-pack allows you to drink whilst walking and is easier to fit in your back-pack.
    • If you take bottles only, ensure you have bottles equivalent to 3 litres per day.
    • You will need to bring water purification

Trail food – you will need to cater for these:

    • 5 breakfasts; 4 lunches; 5 dinners
    • trail snacks; energy drinks (i.e. game powders)
    • Suggestions:
    • Tea/coffee: Cappuccino sachets; condensed milk sachets (if you like sweetened drinks) or normal coffee, tea bags, sugar and powdered milk.
    • Breakfast: Instant Oats sachets/rusks
    • Lunch: Savoury crackers; Tuna sachets, Nola chicken & mayo sachets; 2 min noodles; Cup-a-soup sachets or Cheese for crackers (best in cooler winter months)
    • Dinner: Dehydrated dinners; 2 min noodles with the tuna or chicken sachets to mix in; 2 min noodles with ‘cup a soup’ to mix in; to any of these, you can add salami or biltong.
    • Snacks: Trail Mix (nuts, dried fruit etc); Muesli/energy bars

So, are you up for the challenge then why not reconnect with nature, rejuvenate your spirit and experience nature on a different level. Join the next Wilderness Trails skills course (04 – 09 April 2020) and spend your days walking in a uniquely untouched wilderness area on foot. Email [email protected] for more info.

EcoTraining Pridelands Camp - A mutualistic relationship - Animals & EcoTraining

A mutualistic relationship | Animals & EcoTraining

Celebrating our mutualistic relationship with the animals of EcoTraining Camps.

When you set up an unfenced camp in a wildlife area or game reserve, you are bound to have animals come into your camp relatively often. With the EcoTraining camps, there is no exception.

In fact, a very important aspect of the EcoTraining experience is reconnecting with nature. By living in nature and being close to nature – and staying in one of EcoTraining’s unfenced camps does exactly this. Waking up to birds singing in the morning, having animals walk through the camp, and the occasional snake that has to be removed from a bathroom all encompass a true experience of nature. It may seem dangerous and scary to people at first, but when animals are given respect, it is possible for both humans and animals to live in close proximity without either party being negatively affected.

Elephant in camp

Elephant in Karongwe Camp (c) Zach Savage

Wildlife around Karongwe Camp

From elephants walking through the camp, lions roaring outside your tent, hyenas breaking into the kitchen and baboons stealing fruit from the breakfast table, it is not uncommon to have an encounter with an animal within the camp limits. Sometimes these encounters are awe-inspiring and sometimes they are nerve-racking, but it is highly uncommon for the encounter to end with an animal or person in danger or disturbed.

The most common animals in camps are those that find safety within the space. Nyalas are a prime example of this, with all EcoTraining camps as well as most lodges having resident Nyalas hanging around. This is because camps offer a degree of safety from predators as well as less competition from other herbivores (so more food).

Baboons and vervet monkeys are also common utilisers of campgrounds – likely using the camp areas for safety as well. As anyone who has stayed in a camp will know, they will also try their luck at stealing whatever scraps of food they can get their hands on. A common phenomenon that has been observed with baboons is that they will often flip the rocks that demarcate the pathways in camps – this is in order to find any grubs, scorpions or general bugs hidden under the rocks for them to munch on.

EcoTraining’s Karongwe camp has a resident genet that is often seen commuting through the campgrounds. She has become very habituated and allows people to come quite close, however she is still wild and does not rely on people or the camp for food and safety. It is a strict policy to never feed animals as we don’t want them to start expecting food from people and losing their instinct to get their own food. We also don’t want the animals to lose their instinctual fear of humans as this can aid in their exploitation – for example, poachers can have an easier target if an animal has learnt that humans do not pose a threat.Animals around Karongwe

Some animal encounters around camp (c) Zach Savage & David Niederberger

Wildlife around Makuleke Camp, Greater Kruger National Park

EcoTraining Makuleke has several elephants that frequent the camp. These gentle giants come in only looking to feed on the Brown Ivory, Umbrella thorns and other trees in the camp. The decks in front of each tent always provide for spectacularly close but safe viewing of the elephants as they make their way through the camp.

Elephant in Makuleke

Elephant in Makuleke & Map of Makuleke Camp, Northern Kruger

Respecting the symbiotic relationship

All camps have a plethora of bird, reptile, amphibian and insect life to excite the interests of students when they are in camp and to keep them learning about the nature around them. Even though you are living in a ‘wild’ area, the ethos of EcoTraining is to provide a holistic and safe experience to everyone who spends time in one of our camps. We respect the nature around us and want to maintain a mutualistic relationship on both sides.

At first, it may feel daunting to stay in an EcoTraining unfenced camp. But once you have had a few nights to settle in, you start to love every moment of it – so much so that even a lion roaring five metres from your tent will not scare you. Instead, it will thrill you to your bones and you will connect with the experience on a very primal level – an experience that your ancestors perhaps once had, now reborn in an EcoTraining camp.

Some Trivia fun

Do you know the difference between the large-spotted & small-spotted genets?

 

Differences between genets

Some differences between large-spotted and small spotted genets